Claim: Trump “Denies” Climate Change Because he Hates Wind Turbines

Watts Up With That?

Donald Trump, By Michael Vadon - https://www.flickr.com/photos/80038275@N00/20724666936/, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42609338 Donald Trump, By Michael Vadon – https://www.flickr.com/photos/80038275@N00/20724666936/, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42609338

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Tom Cheshire, Sky Technology Correspondent, has claimed that President-elect Donald Trump is a “climate denier” because of his legal battle to prevent offshore wind turbines messing up sea views at his Aberdeenshire Golf Course.

Sky Views: Why Trump denies climate change

Tom Cheshire, Technology Correspondent

When the oceans rise and the world ends, do remember to thank the RSPB for their small part in armageddon.

I’ll get round to the twitchers’ role in our doom shortly, but that doom feels closer than ever.

Mr Trump’s incoming administration will likely be the most anti-scientific and anti-technological in a while.

The President-elect is a climate change denier, one of his few consistent positions.

Trump denies climate change because he hates wind turbines. Can’t stand them.

Trump didn’t care about global warming until a…

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NOAA’s Climate.gov Says Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Responsible For Methane Increases, Not Oil and Gas

Watts Up With That?

From the NOAA global air sampling network are plotted since the beginning of 1979

From Western Wire

by Michael Sandoval July 18, 2017

“Agricultural and wetland emissions” from the planet’s tropical areas, not oil and gas activities in the United States, are more than likely responsible for a post-2007 global increase in methane levels, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate.gov.

But regulating or mitigating those methane sources could be difficult or impossible.

“Both of the likely contenders for the recent increase in emissions could be tricky to mitigate,” wrote Climate.gov’s Rebecca Lindsey and Michon Scott. “In developing countries with burgeoning populations, methane control could wind up pitted against the need to expand food production. If natural wetlands are the main source of the increase, control may not even be possible,” the authors wrote.

According to Climate.gov, following a 1999 to 2006 global methane plateau scientists attempted…

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