About Rashid Faridi

I am Rashid Aziz Faridi ,Writer, Teacher and a Voracious Reader.

Here’s the Darwin!

Why Evolution Is True

by Greg Mayer

Darwin can be found atop the bookcase which is to the right of the bat poster, and to the left of the ‘curved’ bookcase. On the top row of the ‘curved’ bookcase, 27 books in, is Jerry’s Speciation, followed by two copies of Why Evolution Is True (the copy with the orange spine is the paperback edition). The hard one to find was Faith vs. Fact, since it is in a different section (“History and Philosophy of Science”; Jerry’s other books are in the “Evolution” section), and because the photo is a bit out of focus at the point where it is. It’s the fifth book from the right in the second row of books on the shelf at the right of the photo.

From door to window ledge, the office is 11 ft. The window ledge, which contains the heating/cooling system for the room…

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Climate Communicator: Reimagining Disney Princesses as Climate Scientists

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Guest essay by Eric Worrall h/t Dr. Willie Soon – I’m not sure what to say to introduce this one… If Disney Princesses Were Earth and Environmental Scientists… Welcome to an alternate universe where happily ever after includes a dedication to the scientific method By Mohi Kumar 25 June 2018 Disney princesses are some of…

via Climate Communicator: Reimagining Disney Princesses as Climate Scientists — Watts Up With That?

If McDonald’s is serious about reducing its carbon footprint, it may need to rethink the hamburger

Exposing the Big Game

The company has an ambitious-sounding plan to curb its emissions. But can it really take a meaningful stance on climate change while selling more Big Macs?

ENVIRONMENT FARM NEWS POLICY

In late March, McDonald’s issued a bold press releaseannouncing major cuts to its greenhouse gas emissions—a plan that will require the company to rethink not only how it lights and fuels its restaurants, but also how it sources its beef, which the company says amounts to 29 percent of its carbon footprint.

The changes will “enable McDonald’s to grow as a business without growing its emissions” through 2030, according to the press release, which offers some dazzling figures: a 36 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from restaurants and offices, and a 31 percent reduction in “emissions intensity” from its supply chain (including  beef), which will prevent the…

View original post 2,997 more words

If McDonald’s is serious about reducing its carbon footprint, it may need to rethink the hamburger

Exposing the Big Game

The company has an ambitious-sounding plan to curb its emissions. But can it really take a meaningful stance on climate change while selling more Big Macs?

ENVIRONMENT FARM NEWS POLICY

In late March, McDonald’s issued a bold press releaseannouncing major cuts to its greenhouse gas emissions—a plan that will require the company to rethink not only how it lights and fuels its restaurants, but also how it sources its beef, which the company says amounts to 29 percent of its carbon footprint.

The changes will “enable McDonald’s to grow as a business without growing its emissions” through 2030, according to the press release, which offers some dazzling figures: a 36 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from restaurants and offices, and a 31 percent reduction in “emissions intensity” from its supply chain (including  beef), which will prevent the…

View original post 2,997 more words